This kind of thing is why Facebook is the platform I love to hate. The message here seems to be yes, we’ll grant you access and make sure our platform is inclusive, just don’t talk about the things that make your life difficult. If that’s true, Facebook is about to become less useful, since there are any number of support groups and pages for people dealing with almost anything that can make living feel difficult.

By Simon Sansome In an astonishing recorded call from Facebook, listen below.   Ability Access is the UK’s largest disability page with over 12,000 followers and often goes viral. This week is no exception, with reaching an audience of over 5 million people and 1.5 million interactions. Earlier this week, Ability Access, was blocked from…
— Read on abilityaccess.blog/2019/04/08/breaking-news-disability-is-not-good-for-facebook-says-facebook/

Drafting Chapter Three of Changeling’s Guide to Mastodon for screen readers. I didn’t realize describing the profile section could be so complicated. This platform really does let you include lots of information about yourself.

I have mixed feelings about the recent swarm of ADA lawsuits. It’s great that there’s awareness, but a lot of these businesses don’t even know anything’s wrong until they get nailed with legal papers, and it just feels wrong. Back on the bright side of things, this introvert gets to practice their people skills every time someone contacts me wanting information about it.

To those of you who act incredulous over the costs associated with running a website, I’d like to remind you that having a website is like having a home on the Internet, and nobody gives homes away. All those spaces you have on the internet that give you a free page, that’s like renting an apartment, and it comes with many of the drawbacks of renting, just like your website comes with all the drawbacks of owning a home.